Faculty of Engineering & Technology

Overview

The Faculty of Engineering and Technology at Sampoerna University (FET-SU) aspires to be Indonesia’s leading schools of engineering and technology that is recognized for the quality of its programs, faculty and facilities. We offer a premier educational experience with relevant curricula designed to prepare our graduates for success in competitive careers in computer science, information technology, and engineering. Our programs have been created with leading experts from Indonesia and the United States to respond to the demand to develop highly-skilled professionals in these areas. The lab facilities used by our students represent state-of-the-art technology; they are the best in Indonesia and meet international standards.

FET is at the center of Sampoerna University’s commitment to building STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts and math) competence. Our approach fosters qualities of adaptability, collaboration, creativity and strong communication skills. Our approach, according to industry experts, makes our graduates the most competitive in Indonesia.

Faculty of Engineering and Technology offers the following degree program:

Mechanical Engineering

  • +Double degree with Louisiana State University

Computer Science

  • +With U.S. Degree Supplement from Rice University

Creative Digital Design

  • +U.S. Degree from Michigan State University

Why Sampoerna University Faculty Of Engineering And Technology?

Programs offered by FET are designed to address the nation's talent gap that focuses on delivering academic programs that align with the nation’s demand for highly-trained individuals to fill high-demand jobs in engineering and information technology. Programs in FET are designed to meet the nation’s talent shortage and insure that all of our students are well-positioned to compete for jobs in Indonesia and abroad.

Students will learn, solve and analyze problems using technological tools and collaborative learning strategies across the curriculum. STEAM curriculum and projects are required of all students during the first two years of study at SU regardless of their major. This includes college algebra, biology, chemistry and physics. Numeracy and functional knowledge of key STEAM concepts is required of all graduates and better prepares them for the jobs of the future. This is driven by our understanding that the majority of high-paying jobs in the future will be high-skill and require strong STEAM knowledge. Students also develop their ability to communicate effectively, refine their presentation skills, and learn how to work in groups/teams.

Students in FET enjoy extensive tutoring in specially designated learning spaces at Sampoerna University. Because STEAM competence is vital to the success of students majoring in engineering and technology, all FET students have access to help them succeed in their coursework.

The curriculum offered by FET at Sampoerna University has been developed to not only meet national requirements, but to exceed them. In partnership with leading American universities, students can complete a double degree (engineering) or degree supplements (computer science and creative digital design). All students graduate from FET with both national degrees and American credentials.

Students are taught by the best faculty in Indonesia with over 75% holding the highest degrees in their respective field. This is five times the national average for Indonesian universities. FET students also benefit from visiting international faculty who spend time in-residence. Visiting faculty hold Ph.D.’s from foreign universities and bring decades of academic and industrial experience to SU.

In support of its engineering program, FET students get to learn with hands-on activities in a world-class engineering lab with the most modern, American-made equipment available. Developed in partnership with Louisiana State University, it replicates the educational and lab learning experience offered to students studying at LSU’s campus in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA. Students in our computer science program have access to the latest generation of hardware and software in our multiple computing facilities. Our Creative Digital Design program offers classes in an Innovation Laboratory, a 3-D Visualization Lab and a state-of-the-art Motion Capture Studio. The quality and array of laboratory facilities and equipment available at SU is unrivaled in Indonesia.

Mechanical Engineering

Apply fundamental laws of maths and science to create mechanical devices that we use every day

Mechanical Engineering is the broadest of all engineering disciplines, encompassing areas such as energy, fluid mechanics, dynamics, combustion, vibration, design, manufacturing processes, systems modeling and simulation, mechatronics, and mechanics of material.

Mechanical engineers are employed in virtually every kind of industry. They are involved with seeking new knowledge through research, creative design and development, and with the construction, control, management, and sales of the devices and systems needed by society. A major strength of an education in mechanical engineering is the flexibility it provides in future employment opportunities for its graduates.

Degree

  • + Bachelor of Science from Sampoerna University
  • + Bachelor of Science from Louisiana State University (ABET accredited)

Mode of study

  • Full Time

Duration

  • 4 Years

AREA 1. COMMUNICATIONS                                                           (9 CREDITS)

ENC1101 Composition I                                                                           Credit Hours: 3

ENC1101 is a university parallel course that requires students to learn and practice writing by creating original compositions, exploring basic rhetorical forms such as narration, exposition, and argumentations. Students will also develop research skills and learn to incorporate research material through the writing process. For non-exempt students, placement in ENC1101 is determined by both standard and departmental assessment tests. Students must earn a grade of C or higher to meet the requirements of the Gordon Rule for writing. This is a writing credit course that focuses on extensive writing and revision.

ENC1102 Composition II                                                                            Credit Hours: 3

Composition II is designed to further develop a student's communication skills by building on the writing and critical thinking strategies learned in ENC1101. The course requires students to observe the conventions of Standard American English and create documented essays, demonstrating a student’s ability to think critically and communicate analytically. Selected texts supplement the course and provide topics for discussion and assignments. Students use library research methods for primary and secondary sources to produce MLA style-documented and well-argued research essays and projects. This is a writing credit course. Students must earn a minimum grade of C to meet the requirements of the Gordon Rule for writing.

SPC1608 Introduction to Public Speaking                                                  Credit Hours: 3

This course is designed to provide students with fundamental training and practical experience for speaking in public, business, and professional situations. Topics include: audience analysis, speech anxiety, critical listening, and preparation and delivery of speeches in various cultural contexts. Students will also learn to effectively incorporate audio and visual aids/technologies for effective speeches. This is an International/Intercultural competency course.



 

AREA 2. HUMANITIES                                                                                    (6 CREDITS)

REL2300 World Religions                                                                              Credit Hours: 3

This course is a descriptive examination of the world's most popular religions. This is a writing course with International/Intercultural content. Students must earn a minimum grade of C to meet the requirements of the Gordon Rule for writing.

 

LIT2000 Introduction to Literature                                                              Credit Hours: 3

This introductory course exposes students to the study of literature and a range of widely recognized authors and works. Students will examine and interpret a diverse and representative body of works from genres such as short stories, poetry, creative non-fiction, plays and novels. These selections may include works from many periods and cultures within American, British, and World Literature. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of fundamental concepts and ideas in each of the major literary forms. This is a writing credit course with International/Intercultural content. Students must earn a minimum grade of C to meet the requirements of the Gordon Rule for writing.

PHI2010 Introduction to Philosophy                                                                  Credit Hours: 3

This course is an introduction to the nature of philosophy, philosophical thinking, major intellectual movements in the history of philosophy, and specific problems in philosophy. The relationship between philosophy, society, religion, and culture will be examined. This is a writing credit course with International/Intercultural content course. Students must earn a minimum grade of C to meet the requirements of the Gordon Rule for writing.

 

AREA 3. SOCIAL and BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES                              (6 CREDITS)

ECO2013 Principles of Macroeconomics                                                     Credit Hours: 3

An introductory course in macroeconomic principles covering basic economic problems and concepts. Topics discussed and analyzed include basic economic problems of unemployment and inflation, as well as fiscal and monetary policies. Students will recognize the role of households, businesses and governments in the market economy and in their own lives. This is a writing credit course with International/Intercultural content. Students must earn a minimum grade of C to meet the requirements of the Gordon Rule for writing.

INR2002 Introduction to International Relations                                      Credit Hours: 3

A cross national analysis of the concepts of sovereignty, power, security, economic development and national interests in the formulation of foreign policy; the respective roles of the United Nations and the European Union within the context of the growth of Intergovernmental Organizations and Non-governmental actors such as legislatures and interest groups. Study of the utilization of those concepts on policy of both leading nations and the emerging states with emphasis on both conflictual issues related to both tangible and intangible causes as well as the cooperative aspects of a more globalized and interdependent economic system. This is a writing credit course with International/Intercultural content. Students must earn a minimum grade of C to meet the requirements of the Gordon Rule for writing.

SYG2010 Social Problems                                                                              Credit Hours: 3

This course is an examination of the major social problems found in our changing social environment. More specifically, students will be introduced to a variety of topics which may include inequality based on class, race, ethnicity, education, age; violence in society; the changing family; social problems related to gender and sexual behavior; global social problems. This is a writing credit course with International/Intercultural content. Students must earn a minimum grade of C to meet the requirements of the Gordon Rule for writing.

PSY2012 General Psychology                                                                       Credit Hours: 3

General Psychology reviews the scientific principles related to human behavior and mental processes. Topics include the scientific method, neuroscience, learning, memory, and thinking, emotions, motivation, and health, life span development, personality, psychological disorders, and therapies, and social psychology. This is a writing credit course with International/Intercultural content. Students must earn a minimum grade of C to meet the requirements of the Gordon Rule for writing.

PSY2012L General Psychology Laboratory                                                 

This laboratory course parallels and supplements the instruction given in General Psychology (PSY2012). Illustrated in this course are a variety of experimental and behavioral activities that demonstrate the scientific basis of psychology.

DEP2302 Developmental Psychology II: Adolescent & Young Adult        The personal, social and developmental aspects of adolescence and early adulthood are reviewed in this course. A focus is placed upon the research dealing with the characteristic problems and adjustments of this life stage. This is a writing credit course with International/Intercultural content. Students must earn a minimum grade of C to meet the requirements of the Gordon Rule for writing.

 

AREA 4. SCIENCE, LAB, and WELLNESS                                              (9 CREDITS)

EVR1001 Introduction to Environmental Science                                      Credit Hours: 3

Study of the physical environment, its relationship with the biosphere, and man's impact upon natural systems. This course includes ecological systems, Florida environments and geology, pollution and environmental regulations, renewable and nonrenewable resources, and sustainability. This course meets General Education requirements in the Biological and Physical Sciences. Placement by Testing Department.

CHM1020 Introduction to Chemistry                                                          Credit Hours: 3

Selected topics from general chemistry, organic chemistry and biochemistry. This course is designed specifically for Nursing and other Allied Health Technology students.

CHM1020L Introduction to Chemistry Laboratory                                                Credit Hours: 1

Laboratory experiments to accompany CHM1020.

CHM1045 General Chemistry 1                                                                    Credit Hours: 3

This is the first course in a two semester sequence, CHM 1045 and CHM 1046. This sequence includes two laboratories: CHM 1045L to be taken concurrently with CHM 1045 and CHM 1046L to be taken with CHM 1046. This sequence is for students who have already had high school chemistry. Topics covered include: chemical measurements, stoichiometry, atomic structure periodic table, chemical bonding, inorganic compounds, nomenclature, formula writing, gases, liquids, solids, solutions acid-base chemistry and ionic reactions and some descriptive chemistry of non-metals. To enroll, it is strongly recommended that students have had previous chemistry at the high school or college level. If a student has not had prior experience in a chemistry course the CHM 1040/CHM 1041/CHM 1046 sequence is highly recommended.

CHM1045L General Chemistry I Laboratory                                                            Credit Hours: 1

Laboratory experiments to accompany CHM1041 or CHM1045.

PHY2048 General Physics with Calculus I Credit Hours: 4

PHY2048 is part one of a comprehensive course in physics outlining mechanics, heat, and wave motion using analysis in calculus.

PHY2048L General Physics with Calculus I Laboratory                              Credit Hours: 1

PHY2048L is a laboratory which allows students to able to collect and analyze data in a variety of experiments covering topics covered in its companion course PHY2048. Students will create experiment reports using analysis in calculus.

HLP1081 Total Wellness                                                                                Credit Hours: 2

Total Wellness emphasizes the importance of knowledge, attitudes, and practices relating to personal wellness. It is a course designed to expose students to a broad range of issues and information relating to the various aspects of personal wellness including physical, social emotional, intellectual, spiritual and environmental wellness. This course integrates personal wellness and fitness in both a classroom and exercise environment. Evolving current topics such as nutrition, disease prevention, stress reduction, exercise prescription, and environmental responsibility are integrated to enable the student to understand the lifelong effects of healthy lifestyle choices. This is an International/Intercultural competency course.

BOT2800 Plants & People                                                                             Credit Hours: 3

This course will emphasize the role of plants in the development of civilizations, and the influence of plants on world history, politics, economics and culture. Will survey important plants and plant products from different cultures around the world.

BSC1005L Biological Principles for Non-Majors Laboratory                      Credit Hours: 1

Two hours of laboratory weekly which provides hands on activities that develop basic laboratory skills while reinforcing basic concepts in biology. Dissection exercises may be a component of this course.

 

AREA 5. MATHEMATICS                                                                                  (6 CREDITS)

MAC1105 College Algebra                                                                            Credit Hours: 3

A college algebra course containing topics such as solving, graphing and applying linear and quadratic equations and inequalities; exponential and logarithmic properties; linear, quadratic, rational, absolute value, square root, cubic, and reciprocal functions operations, compositions, and inverses of functions; and systems of equations and inequalities, all with applications throughout the course. Recommendation from the Mathematics Department or at least a grade of a “C” in the prerequisite coursework is required.

STA2023 Statistics                                                                                         Credit Hours: 3

A first course in statistical methods including such topics as collecting, grouping, and presenting data; measures of central tendency, position, and variation; theoretical distributions; probability; test of hypotheses; estimation of parameters; and regression and correlation. Use of statistical computer software and/or a scientific calculator (capable of performing 2-variable statistics) will be required. Recommendation of the Mathematics Department or at least a grade of "C" in the prerequisite course is required.

MAC1147 Pre-calculus Algebra & Trigonometry                                        Credit Hours: 5

This course is designed to satisfy the dual requirements of MAC1114 and MAC1140, thus preparing the student for the study of calculus. In this course the student will study various function families (e.g. polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric) from both analytic and graphical viewpoints, and will use them to model real-life situations. The student will be exposed to additional topics that will deepen their mathematical understanding, including systems, matrices and determinants, sequences and series, parametric equations, and polar coordinates and equations. A graphing calculator may be required. Recommendation from the Mathematics Department or at least a grade of a “B” in the prerequisite coursework required.

MAC 2311 Calculus & Analytical Geometry I                                              Credit Hours: 5

This is the first of a three-course sequence in calculus. Students may need to a graphing calculator throughout the sequence of courses. Topics include: analytic geometry, functions, limits, continuity, derivatives and their applications, transcendental functions, antiderivatives, and definite integrals. Certain sections of this course may require the use of a graphing calculator. Recommendation from the Mathematics Department or at least a grade of a “C” in the prerequisite coursework required.

MAC2233 Calculus for Business, Social & Life Sciences                              Credit Hours: 3

This is a general education course which includes the college-level skills of calculus such as: functions, graphs, limits, differentiation, integration, average and instantaneous rates of change, and other applications. Recommendation from the Mathematics Department or at least a grade of a “C” in the prerequisite coursework required.

 

Click here to see the course descriptions.

The versatility of the field means that mechanical engineering graduates would be able to compete for any job that requires competencies in science, technology, and engineering with a strong quantitative backbone. Mechanical engineers carry with them an ability to solve problems, from the known to the unknown, in a logical and reproducible manner, thus allowing for the creation of leading-edge innovations in any sector in which they happen to work. These skills, along with the universally-recognized competencies of mechanical engineers, make a mechanical engineering degree one of the most-sought-after degrees in various industries and sectors today.

Computer Science

Talk to the computer in its language so you can make it do what you want it to do

 

Program description

Computer science spans the range from theory to programming. Computer Science program offers a comprehensive foundation that permits its graduates to adapt to new technologies and new ideas in computing. Computer science spans a wide range, from theoretical and algorithmic foundations to developments in new areas such as robotics, computer vision, intelligent systems, bioinformatics, and others.

Computer Science graduates (i.e. Computer Scientists) design and develop all types of software from systems infrastructure (operating systems, communications programs, etc.) to application technologies (web browsers, databases, search engines, etc.). The work of computer scientists can be grouped into the following categories:

● They design and implement software. Computer scientists take on various programming jobs. They also supervise other programmers, keeping them aware of new approaches.
● They devise new ways to use computers. Progress in the computer science areas of networking, database, and human-computer-interface enabled the development of the World Wide Web. Computer science researchers are working with scientists from other fields, e.g. to make robots become practical and intelligent aides, to use databases to create new knowledge, and to use computers to help decipher the secrets of DNA.
● They develop effective ways to solve computing problems. For example, computer scientists develop the best possible ways to store information in databases, send data over networks, and display complex images. Their theoretical background allows them to determine the best performance possible, and their study of algorithms helps them to develop new approaches that provide better performance.
● Computer Science graduates will be highly-sought by employers and earn good starting salaries. Our graduates can expect to gain employment as information technology engineers, analysts, administrators and programmers.

Degree

  • + Bachelor of Science from Sampoerna University
  • + Bachelor of Science from Louisiana State University (ABET accredited)

Mode of study

  • Full Time

Duration

  • 4 Years

AREA 1. COMMUNICATIONS                                                           (9 CREDITS)

ENC1101 Composition I                                                                           Credit Hours: 3

ENC1101 is a university parallel course that requires students to learn and practice writing by creating original compositions, exploring basic rhetorical forms such as narration, exposition, and argumentations. Students will also develop research skills and learn to incorporate research material through the writing process. For non-exempt students, placement in ENC1101 is determined by both standard and departmental assessment tests. Students must earn a grade of C or higher to meet the requirements of the Gordon Rule for writing. This is a writing credit course that focuses on extensive writing and revision.

ENC1102 Composition II                                                                            Credit Hours: 3

Composition II is designed to further develop a student's communication skills by building on the writing and critical thinking strategies learned in ENC1101. The course requires students to observe the conventions of Standard American English and create documented essays, demonstrating a student’s ability to think critically and communicate analytically. Selected texts supplement the course and provide topics for discussion and assignments. Students use library research methods for primary and secondary sources to produce MLA style-documented and well-argued research essays and projects. This is a writing credit course. Students must earn a minimum grade of C to meet the requirements of the Gordon Rule for writing.

SPC1608 Introduction to Public Speaking                                                  Credit Hours: 3

This course is designed to provide students with fundamental training and practical experience for speaking in public, business, and professional situations. Topics include: audience analysis, speech anxiety, critical listening, and preparation and delivery of speeches in various cultural contexts. Students will also learn to effectively incorporate audio and visual aids/technologies for effective speeches. This is an International/Intercultural competency course.



 

AREA 2. HUMANITIES                                                                                    (6 CREDITS)

REL2300 World Religions                                                                              Credit Hours: 3

This course is a descriptive examination of the world's most popular religions. This is a writing course with International/Intercultural content. Students must earn a minimum grade of C to meet the requirements of the Gordon Rule for writing.

 

LIT2000 Introduction to Literature                                                              Credit Hours: 3

This introductory course exposes students to the study of literature and a range of widely recognized authors and works. Students will examine and interpret a diverse and representative body of works from genres such as short stories, poetry, creative non-fiction, plays and novels. These selections may include works from many periods and cultures within American, British, and World Literature. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of fundamental concepts and ideas in each of the major literary forms. This is a writing credit course with International/Intercultural content. Students must earn a minimum grade of C to meet the requirements of the Gordon Rule for writing.

PHI2010 Introduction to Philosophy                                                                  Credit Hours: 3

This course is an introduction to the nature of philosophy, philosophical thinking, major intellectual movements in the history of philosophy, and specific problems in philosophy. The relationship between philosophy, society, religion, and culture will be examined. This is a writing credit course with International/Intercultural content course. Students must earn a minimum grade of C to meet the requirements of the Gordon Rule for writing.

 

AREA 3. SOCIAL and BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES                              (6 CREDITS)

ECO2013 Principles of Macroeconomics                                                     Credit Hours: 3

An introductory course in macroeconomic principles covering basic economic problems and concepts. Topics discussed and analyzed include basic economic problems of unemployment and inflation, as well as fiscal and monetary policies. Students will recognize the role of households, businesses and governments in the market economy and in their own lives. This is a writing credit course with International/Intercultural content. Students must earn a minimum grade of C to meet the requirements of the Gordon Rule for writing.

INR2002 Introduction to International Relations                                      Credit Hours: 3

A cross national analysis of the concepts of sovereignty, power, security, economic development and national interests in the formulation of foreign policy; the respective roles of the United Nations and the European Union within the context of the growth of Intergovernmental Organizations and Non-governmental actors such as legislatures and interest groups. Study of the utilization of those concepts on policy of both leading nations and the emerging states with emphasis on both conflictual issues related to both tangible and intangible causes as well as the cooperative aspects of a more globalized and interdependent economic system. This is a writing credit course with International/Intercultural content. Students must earn a minimum grade of C to meet the requirements of the Gordon Rule for writing.

SYG2010 Social Problems                                                                              Credit Hours: 3

This course is an examination of the major social problems found in our changing social environment. More specifically, students will be introduced to a variety of topics which may include inequality based on class, race, ethnicity, education, age; violence in society; the changing family; social problems related to gender and sexual behavior; global social problems. This is a writing credit course with International/Intercultural content. Students must earn a minimum grade of C to meet the requirements of the Gordon Rule for writing.

PSY2012 General Psychology                                                                       Credit Hours: 3

General Psychology reviews the scientific principles related to human behavior and mental processes. Topics include the scientific method, neuroscience, learning, memory, and thinking, emotions, motivation, and health, life span development, personality, psychological disorders, and therapies, and social psychology. This is a writing credit course with International/Intercultural content. Students must earn a minimum grade of C to meet the requirements of the Gordon Rule for writing.

PSY2012L General Psychology Laboratory                                                 

This laboratory course parallels and supplements the instruction given in General Psychology (PSY2012). Illustrated in this course are a variety of experimental and behavioral activities that demonstrate the scientific basis of psychology.

DEP2302 Developmental Psychology II: Adolescent & Young Adult        The personal, social and developmental aspects of adolescence and early adulthood are reviewed in this course. A focus is placed upon the research dealing with the characteristic problems and adjustments of this life stage. This is a writing credit course with International/Intercultural content. Students must earn a minimum grade of C to meet the requirements of the Gordon Rule for writing.

 

AREA 4. SCIENCE, LAB, and WELLNESS                                              (9 CREDITS)

EVR1001 Introduction to Environmental Science                                      Credit Hours: 3

Study of the physical environment, its relationship with the biosphere, and man's impact upon natural systems. This course includes ecological systems, Florida environments and geology, pollution and environmental regulations, renewable and nonrenewable resources, and sustainability. This course meets General Education requirements in the Biological and Physical Sciences. Placement by Testing Department.

CHM1020 Introduction to Chemistry                                                          Credit Hours: 3

Selected topics from general chemistry, organic chemistry and biochemistry. This course is designed specifically for Nursing and other Allied Health Technology students.

CHM1020L Introduction to Chemistry Laboratory                                                Credit Hours: 1

Laboratory experiments to accompany CHM1020.

CHM1045 General Chemistry 1                                                                    Credit Hours: 3

This is the first course in a two semester sequence, CHM 1045 and CHM 1046. This sequence includes two laboratories: CHM 1045L to be taken concurrently with CHM 1045 and CHM 1046L to be taken with CHM 1046. This sequence is for students who have already had high school chemistry. Topics covered include: chemical measurements, stoichiometry, atomic structure periodic table, chemical bonding, inorganic compounds, nomenclature, formula writing, gases, liquids, solids, solutions acid-base chemistry and ionic reactions and some descriptive chemistry of non-metals. To enroll, it is strongly recommended that students have had previous chemistry at the high school or college level. If a student has not had prior experience in a chemistry course the CHM 1040/CHM 1041/CHM 1046 sequence is highly recommended.

CHM1045L General Chemistry I Laboratory                                                            Credit Hours: 1

Laboratory experiments to accompany CHM1041 or CHM1045.

PHY2048 General Physics with Calculus I Credit Hours: 4

PHY2048 is part one of a comprehensive course in physics outlining mechanics, heat, and wave motion using analysis in calculus.

PHY2048L General Physics with Calculus I Laboratory                              Credit Hours: 1

PHY2048L is a laboratory which allows students to able to collect and analyze data in a variety of experiments covering topics covered in its companion course PHY2048. Students will create experiment reports using analysis in calculus.

HLP1081 Total Wellness                                                                                Credit Hours: 2

Total Wellness emphasizes the importance of knowledge, attitudes, and practices relating to personal wellness. It is a course designed to expose students to a broad range of issues and information relating to the various aspects of personal wellness including physical, social emotional, intellectual, spiritual and environmental wellness. This course integrates personal wellness and fitness in both a classroom and exercise environment. Evolving current topics such as nutrition, disease prevention, stress reduction, exercise prescription, and environmental responsibility are integrated to enable the student to understand the lifelong effects of healthy lifestyle choices. This is an International/Intercultural competency course.

BOT2800 Plants & People                                                                             Credit Hours: 3

This course will emphasize the role of plants in the development of civilizations, and the influence of plants on world history, politics, economics and culture. Will survey important plants and plant products from different cultures around the world.

BSC1005L Biological Principles for Non-Majors Laboratory                      Credit Hours: 1

Two hours of laboratory weekly which provides hands on activities that develop basic laboratory skills while reinforcing basic concepts in biology. Dissection exercises may be a component of this course.

 

AREA 5. MATHEMATICS                                                                                  (6 CREDITS)

MAC1105 College Algebra                                                                            Credit Hours: 3

A college algebra course containing topics such as solving, graphing and applying linear and quadratic equations and inequalities; exponential and logarithmic properties; linear, quadratic, rational, absolute value, square root, cubic, and reciprocal functions operations, compositions, and inverses of functions; and systems of equations and inequalities, all with applications throughout the course. Recommendation from the Mathematics Department or at least a grade of a “C” in the prerequisite coursework is required.

STA2023 Statistics                                                                                         Credit Hours: 3

A first course in statistical methods including such topics as collecting, grouping, and presenting data; measures of central tendency, position, and variation; theoretical distributions; probability; test of hypotheses; estimation of parameters; and regression and correlation. Use of statistical computer software and/or a scientific calculator (capable of performing 2-variable statistics) will be required. Recommendation of the Mathematics Department or at least a grade of "C" in the prerequisite course is required.

MAC1147 Pre-calculus Algebra & Trigonometry                                        Credit Hours: 5

This course is designed to satisfy the dual requirements of MAC1114 and MAC1140, thus preparing the student for the study of calculus. In this course the student will study various function families (e.g. polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric) from both analytic and graphical viewpoints, and will use them to model real-life situations. The student will be exposed to additional topics that will deepen their mathematical understanding, including systems, matrices and determinants, sequences and series, parametric equations, and polar coordinates and equations. A graphing calculator may be required. Recommendation from the Mathematics Department or at least a grade of a “B” in the prerequisite coursework required.

MAC 2311 Calculus & Analytical Geometry I                                              Credit Hours: 5

This is the first of a three-course sequence in calculus. Students may need to a graphing calculator throughout the sequence of courses. Topics include: analytic geometry, functions, limits, continuity, derivatives and their applications, transcendental functions, antiderivatives, and definite integrals. Certain sections of this course may require the use of a graphing calculator. Recommendation from the Mathematics Department or at least a grade of a “C” in the prerequisite coursework required.

MAC2233 Calculus for Business, Social & Life Sciences                              Credit Hours: 3

This is a general education course which includes the college-level skills of calculus such as: functions, graphs, limits, differentiation, integration, average and instantaneous rates of change, and other applications. Recommendation from the Mathematics Department or at least a grade of a “C” in the prerequisite coursework required.

 

Click here to see the course descriptions.

Potential career pathways for graduates of Computer Science include but is not limited to:

● Software applications developers;
● Computer systems analysts;
● Computer systems engineers;
● Network systems administrators;
● Database administrators;
● Business intelligence analysts;
● Web systems developers;
● Computer programmers.

Creative Digital Design

Master the art of creating visual solutions to communications problems

Creative Digital Design, or CDD, is a program that utilizes technological tools and proficiencies to empower students to design for the multitude of media platforms that are found everywhere today, including but not limited to online media, print media (newspapers, books, magazines), and mobile applications. A visual presentation that is technically competent and aesthetically communicative is crucial for every industry today, and the CDD program produces graduates that can deliver a beginning-to-end design output for any industry.

Students acquire design and composition principles related to all forms of digital media including:
● Web design and development
● Digital/video media development, production and editing
● Computer illustrations and animation
● Audio production and editing
● 3-D visualization and motion capture technologies

Degree

  • + Bachelor of Science from Sampoerna University
  • + Bachelor of Science from Louisiana State University (ABET accredited)

Mode of study

  • Full Time

Duration

  • 4 Years

AREA 1. COMMUNICATIONS                                                           (9 CREDITS)

ENC1101 Composition I                                                                           Credit Hours: 3

ENC1101 is a university parallel course that requires students to learn and practice writing by creating original compositions, exploring basic rhetorical forms such as narration, exposition, and argumentations. Students will also develop research skills and learn to incorporate research material through the writing process. For non-exempt students, placement in ENC1101 is determined by both standard and departmental assessment tests. Students must earn a grade of C or higher to meet the requirements of the Gordon Rule for writing. This is a writing credit course that focuses on extensive writing and revision.

ENC1102 Composition II                                                                            Credit Hours: 3

Composition II is designed to further develop a student's communication skills by building on the writing and critical thinking strategies learned in ENC1101. The course requires students to observe the conventions of Standard American English and create documented essays, demonstrating a student’s ability to think critically and communicate analytically. Selected texts supplement the course and provide topics for discussion and assignments. Students use library research methods for primary and secondary sources to produce MLA style-documented and well-argued research essays and projects. This is a writing credit course. Students must earn a minimum grade of C to meet the requirements of the Gordon Rule for writing.

SPC1608 Introduction to Public Speaking                                                  Credit Hours: 3

This course is designed to provide students with fundamental training and practical experience for speaking in public, business, and professional situations. Topics include: audience analysis, speech anxiety, critical listening, and preparation and delivery of speeches in various cultural contexts. Students will also learn to effectively incorporate audio and visual aids/technologies for effective speeches. This is an International/Intercultural competency course.



 

AREA 2. HUMANITIES                                                                                    (6 CREDITS)

REL2300 World Religions                                                                              Credit Hours: 3

This course is a descriptive examination of the world's most popular religions. This is a writing course with International/Intercultural content. Students must earn a minimum grade of C to meet the requirements of the Gordon Rule for writing.

 

LIT2000 Introduction to Literature                                                              Credit Hours: 3

This introductory course exposes students to the study of literature and a range of widely recognized authors and works. Students will examine and interpret a diverse and representative body of works from genres such as short stories, poetry, creative non-fiction, plays and novels. These selections may include works from many periods and cultures within American, British, and World Literature. Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of fundamental concepts and ideas in each of the major literary forms. This is a writing credit course with International/Intercultural content. Students must earn a minimum grade of C to meet the requirements of the Gordon Rule for writing.

PHI2010 Introduction to Philosophy                                                                  Credit Hours: 3

This course is an introduction to the nature of philosophy, philosophical thinking, major intellectual movements in the history of philosophy, and specific problems in philosophy. The relationship between philosophy, society, religion, and culture will be examined. This is a writing credit course with International/Intercultural content course. Students must earn a minimum grade of C to meet the requirements of the Gordon Rule for writing.

 

AREA 3. SOCIAL and BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES                              (6 CREDITS)

ECO2013 Principles of Macroeconomics                                                     Credit Hours: 3

An introductory course in macroeconomic principles covering basic economic problems and concepts. Topics discussed and analyzed include basic economic problems of unemployment and inflation, as well as fiscal and monetary policies. Students will recognize the role of households, businesses and governments in the market economy and in their own lives. This is a writing credit course with International/Intercultural content. Students must earn a minimum grade of C to meet the requirements of the Gordon Rule for writing.

INR2002 Introduction to International Relations                                      Credit Hours: 3

A cross national analysis of the concepts of sovereignty, power, security, economic development and national interests in the formulation of foreign policy; the respective roles of the United Nations and the European Union within the context of the growth of Intergovernmental Organizations and Non-governmental actors such as legislatures and interest groups. Study of the utilization of those concepts on policy of both leading nations and the emerging states with emphasis on both conflictual issues related to both tangible and intangible causes as well as the cooperative aspects of a more globalized and interdependent economic system. This is a writing credit course with International/Intercultural content. Students must earn a minimum grade of C to meet the requirements of the Gordon Rule for writing.

SYG2010 Social Problems                                                                              Credit Hours: 3

This course is an examination of the major social problems found in our changing social environment. More specifically, students will be introduced to a variety of topics which may include inequality based on class, race, ethnicity, education, age; violence in society; the changing family; social problems related to gender and sexual behavior; global social problems. This is a writing credit course with International/Intercultural content. Students must earn a minimum grade of C to meet the requirements of the Gordon Rule for writing.

PSY2012 General Psychology                                                                       Credit Hours: 3

General Psychology reviews the scientific principles related to human behavior and mental processes. Topics include the scientific method, neuroscience, learning, memory, and thinking, emotions, motivation, and health, life span development, personality, psychological disorders, and therapies, and social psychology. This is a writing credit course with International/Intercultural content. Students must earn a minimum grade of C to meet the requirements of the Gordon Rule for writing.

PSY2012L General Psychology Laboratory                                                 

This laboratory course parallels and supplements the instruction given in General Psychology (PSY2012). Illustrated in this course are a variety of experimental and behavioral activities that demonstrate the scientific basis of psychology.

DEP2302 Developmental Psychology II: Adolescent & Young Adult        The personal, social and developmental aspects of adolescence and early adulthood are reviewed in this course. A focus is placed upon the research dealing with the characteristic problems and adjustments of this life stage. This is a writing credit course with International/Intercultural content. Students must earn a minimum grade of C to meet the requirements of the Gordon Rule for writing.

 

AREA 4. SCIENCE, LAB, and WELLNESS                                              (9 CREDITS)

EVR1001 Introduction to Environmental Science                                      Credit Hours: 3

Study of the physical environment, its relationship with the biosphere, and man's impact upon natural systems. This course includes ecological systems, Florida environments and geology, pollution and environmental regulations, renewable and nonrenewable resources, and sustainability. This course meets General Education requirements in the Biological and Physical Sciences. Placement by Testing Department.

CHM1020 Introduction to Chemistry                                                          Credit Hours: 3

Selected topics from general chemistry, organic chemistry and biochemistry. This course is designed specifically for Nursing and other Allied Health Technology students.

CHM1020L Introduction to Chemistry Laboratory                                                Credit Hours: 1

Laboratory experiments to accompany CHM1020.

CHM1045 General Chemistry 1                                                                    Credit Hours: 3

This is the first course in a two semester sequence, CHM 1045 and CHM 1046. This sequence includes two laboratories: CHM 1045L to be taken concurrently with CHM 1045 and CHM 1046L to be taken with CHM 1046. This sequence is for students who have already had high school chemistry. Topics covered include: chemical measurements, stoichiometry, atomic structure periodic table, chemical bonding, inorganic compounds, nomenclature, formula writing, gases, liquids, solids, solutions acid-base chemistry and ionic reactions and some descriptive chemistry of non-metals. To enroll, it is strongly recommended that students have had previous chemistry at the high school or college level. If a student has not had prior experience in a chemistry course the CHM 1040/CHM 1041/CHM 1046 sequence is highly recommended.

CHM1045L General Chemistry I Laboratory                                                            Credit Hours: 1

Laboratory experiments to accompany CHM1041 or CHM1045.

PHY2048 General Physics with Calculus I Credit Hours: 4

PHY2048 is part one of a comprehensive course in physics outlining mechanics, heat, and wave motion using analysis in calculus.

PHY2048L General Physics with Calculus I Laboratory                              Credit Hours: 1

PHY2048L is a laboratory which allows students to able to collect and analyze data in a variety of experiments covering topics covered in its companion course PHY2048. Students will create experiment reports using analysis in calculus.

HLP1081 Total Wellness                                                                                Credit Hours: 2

Total Wellness emphasizes the importance of knowledge, attitudes, and practices relating to personal wellness. It is a course designed to expose students to a broad range of issues and information relating to the various aspects of personal wellness including physical, social emotional, intellectual, spiritual and environmental wellness. This course integrates personal wellness and fitness in both a classroom and exercise environment. Evolving current topics such as nutrition, disease prevention, stress reduction, exercise prescription, and environmental responsibility are integrated to enable the student to understand the lifelong effects of healthy lifestyle choices. This is an International/Intercultural competency course.

BOT2800 Plants & People                                                                             Credit Hours: 3

This course will emphasize the role of plants in the development of civilizations, and the influence of plants on world history, politics, economics and culture. Will survey important plants and plant products from different cultures around the world.

BSC1005L Biological Principles for Non-Majors Laboratory                      Credit Hours: 1

Two hours of laboratory weekly which provides hands on activities that develop basic laboratory skills while reinforcing basic concepts in biology. Dissection exercises may be a component of this course.

 

AREA 5. MATHEMATICS                                                                                  (6 CREDITS)

MAC1105 College Algebra                                                                            Credit Hours: 3

A college algebra course containing topics such as solving, graphing and applying linear and quadratic equations and inequalities; exponential and logarithmic properties; linear, quadratic, rational, absolute value, square root, cubic, and reciprocal functions operations, compositions, and inverses of functions; and systems of equations and inequalities, all with applications throughout the course. Recommendation from the Mathematics Department or at least a grade of a “C” in the prerequisite coursework is required.

STA2023 Statistics                                                                                         Credit Hours: 3

A first course in statistical methods including such topics as collecting, grouping, and presenting data; measures of central tendency, position, and variation; theoretical distributions; probability; test of hypotheses; estimation of parameters; and regression and correlation. Use of statistical computer software and/or a scientific calculator (capable of performing 2-variable statistics) will be required. Recommendation of the Mathematics Department or at least a grade of "C" in the prerequisite course is required.

MAC1147 Pre-calculus Algebra & Trigonometry                                        Credit Hours: 5

This course is designed to satisfy the dual requirements of MAC1114 and MAC1140, thus preparing the student for the study of calculus. In this course the student will study various function families (e.g. polynomial, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric) from both analytic and graphical viewpoints, and will use them to model real-life situations. The student will be exposed to additional topics that will deepen their mathematical understanding, including systems, matrices and determinants, sequences and series, parametric equations, and polar coordinates and equations. A graphing calculator may be required. Recommendation from the Mathematics Department or at least a grade of a “B” in the prerequisite coursework required.

MAC 2311 Calculus & Analytical Geometry I                                              Credit Hours: 5

This is the first of a three-course sequence in calculus. Students may need to a graphing calculator throughout the sequence of courses. Topics include: analytic geometry, functions, limits, continuity, derivatives and their applications, transcendental functions, antiderivatives, and definite integrals. Certain sections of this course may require the use of a graphing calculator. Recommendation from the Mathematics Department or at least a grade of a “C” in the prerequisite coursework required.

MAC2233 Calculus for Business, Social & Life Sciences                              Credit Hours: 3

This is a general education course which includes the college-level skills of calculus such as: functions, graphs, limits, differentiation, integration, average and instantaneous rates of change, and other applications. Recommendation from the Mathematics Department or at least a grade of a “C” in the prerequisite coursework required.

 

Click here to see the course descriptions.

Graduates of the Creative Digital Design program enjoy a high-level of employability. They will typically find jobs working in an information technology environment as:
● Digital Artists
● Graphic Designers
● Animators
● Audio/Video Technicians
● Web Developers
● Film and Video Editors.
● Multimedia Artists/Animators.

 

With more experience and advanced credentials, graduates can fulfill roles as:
● Art Directors
● Creative Directors
● Drafters (Architecture and Engineering)
● Industrial/Product Designers
● Marketing Managers

Contact Info

Muhammad Agni Catur Bhakti

Office:L’Avenue Office Tower
North Tower 6th Floor
Jl. Raya Pasar Minggu Kav. 16
Jakarta Selatan 12780
Email: muhammad.bhakti@sampoernauniversity.ac.id

+62 21 50 2222 34 Ext. 7718
Maria Wahyuni

Office: L’Avenue Office Tower
North Tower 6th Floor
Jl. Raya Pasar Minggu Kav. 16
Jakarta Selatan 12780

+62 21 50 2222 34 Ext. 7717
Program coordinator

Office: L’Avenue Office Tower
North Tower 6th Floor
Jl. Raya Pasar Minggu Kav. 16
Jakarta Selatan 12780

+62 21 50 2222 34

Other Engineering and Technology Faculty Program